Wednesday, 25 April 2012

The meaning of ANZAC DAy

This post has nothing to do with food, gluten free or autism in any way, sorry to my regular readers it has something to do with a national event of remembrance, of commemoration of our army, navy and airforce men and women. It's about ANZAC Day 25th April 1915, Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. Every country matter what side of the war your country fought on has a national day of remembrance. I'm writing this post to create awareness of what happened why we still remember and why it's important to me. I had 2 great grandfathers and a great uncle fight in WW1, 1 for Australia, the other for Britain. Australia was a young country we had only just become a federation in 1901, WW1 was the first time the world and Australia saw the country as a nation, not just states! Young men, some as young as 15 changed their age to follow the war propaganda and fight for the mother country, they weren't trained soldiers and had no idea what awaited for them on the other side! The war at Anzac cove was to fight for the Dardnelle Straights, a great shipping source for the Turks and the British and allied forces wanted to gain this for themselves. There was a massive mistake made by British generals in getting the correct coordinates for the Australian and New Zealand Forces to begin their dawn attack. It was only when they landed and were showered by machine gun fire did they realise something was a miss. These young men landed on that beach facing soaring cliffs with the Turks sitting on top of the hill heavily armed. The British generals were unwilling to admit a mistake had been made and the men fought on side by side being fired on, digging trenches, to gain some form of protection. The powers to be kept on ordering these men to go over the top to gain more enemy ground, the odds of returning after going over the top were very low! This campaign continued for many months! This is where the Australian spirit was born, in times of adversity we stand beside our brother, we hold him up, we keep on going, we become each others family. News started to get back home about the horrendous conditions that the ANZAC men were enduring. Australian women began making care packages to send to the soldiers, including a Biscuits made of oats that would last a long time, too still be resonably fresh by the time it reached the shores of Gallipoli. This is where the ANZAZ biscuit was born (in the next week I'll made gf ANZAC using quinoa flakes). These biscuits still remain a very popular biscuit nearly 100 years on. The ANZACS had a game they played, a gambling game called two up. Two men would play for an agreed price another would call and judge, they would toss a coin and call either heads up or tails up, the winner won the money. In Australia after ANZAC services people generally flock to pubs and Returned Servicemens Clubs to have a drink, catch up with mates and play two up. It's the only time of the year the game is permitted. Yet another tradition nearly 100 years old that still continues today! Today is not about glorifying war, it is about remembering the sacrifice that put ancestors gave for the freedom we have today. Australian men and women are still fighting today for our freedom for peace. I would like to acknowledge all the massive sacrifices of life on both sides. If these men would have meant in different circumstances they would probably be sitting down over a beer and a chat. Loss is felt on both sides and we acknowledge those losses too! So if your children are from year 1 about 7 explain to them about ANZAC day, about Galliopoli and the coming of a nation, the international acknowledgment of Australians and why it is important to remember what happened and not let history repeat itself! At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them Lest we forget. Please share with me the date of your countries national day of rememberance and why it is so important. It would be amazing if we could create an international list of days of remberance. Thankyou to all the servicemen men, women and dogs who continue to do an amazing job in all your postings over the world. Enjoy your ANZAC day Xx

2 comments:

Debyl1 said...

Beautiful post.Thankyou for reminding us we need to keep the memories alive by forever telling the stories to our children.They are the future.
One of my proudest moments was an Anzac day when my girl was in grade one and we lived on an island.At 4.30am she proudly got dressed and we all met at school and caught the bus down to the end of the island where there was a small patch of beach.There all the children lined up and my girl and a little boy were at the front and led the march to a memorial plaque and there she layed the wreath.
As the service went quiet while we listen to the tune play out,the sun began to rise,two beautiful dolphins swam up as close to shore as they could.Wow.It was like a sign.
Those children never forgot why they were there that day and never will.xx

Mishaps and Mayhem of a Gluten Free Life said...

Wow Deb! What a wonderful story! I always teach classes about ANZAC day what it means, and how quite those children stood whilst the ANZAC ceremony was taking place was amazing. They understood every moment of it! The historian in me couldn't help but tell this story. Yours is so memorable it gave me goosbumps! You are right those children will never forgot that day and why they were there. Thanks for sharing your story. I hope to hear many more.